Car Stereo Deck

Hey everybody, I hope you all had a great weekend. I would like to welcome you guys back to my vehicle blog. I thought today I would spend a little time talking about something that as a driver born in the mid 90’s is very important to me-stereo decks. I recently bought a really shitty old car, like the first one I bought actually. I needed a stereo deck for it and was lucky enough to find some used ones online from this website selling used parts(http://www.for-sale.com/ has lots of used car parts)  and it reminded me of when I had to do the exact same thing just over 5 years ago. I remember it very vividly, I had bought a new deck for my 2000 Saturn S series and found myself sitting in the small parking space behind my house trying for hours and hours to first get the original deck out and then get the fancy one in. As someone who had spent more time with a controller in my hand than a wrench this was a very, very difficult task.

 

Car Stereo ready to install

How To Install

After buying a used car( which is what you are most likely buying if you need to replace the deck) it’s always good to try and save some money where you can just in case those unexpected expenses start piling up. That’s why it's best to try and find a used car stereo and to also install in yourself. Best Buy charges over $60 for a simple installation( check it out on their website if you don’t believe me http://www.bestbuy.com/site/car-electronics-professional-installation/car-audio-installation/pcmcat143000050016.c?id=pcmcat143000050016) , adn they usually won't include running auxiliary cables through the dash so they don't just come from behind the stereo. That’s enough to get a new-to-you pair of passenger and drivers speakers, or if you're lucky maybe even a sub for the back. That’s why I have compiled a basic little guide on how to install your car stereo deck that should work for most makes and models. Let’s take a look shall we?

 

Tools-First thing first you need the right tools. These will include:

-Screw Drivers

-Wrenches/ Sockets

-Pry Tools

And if you want to do your own wiring (so without buying a harness which run about $15)

-Multimeter

-1.5v battery

-Soldering kit

 

Or

 

-Butt connectors

-Wire Crimpers

 

Removing the Car Stereo Deck

 

Now that we have all the tools we need, let's get to it!

 
  1. Very first thing to do before doing any work on a vehicle is to assure the park brake is on and that the negative cable for the battery is not connected. This will prevent any shorts.

  2. Assess how your factory installed car stereo deck is installed; it will be either held in with spring clips in a metal mounting, or bolted to the dash with brackets. That will dicates what to do next.

  3. Springs-  Use your pry tools and slide them into the gaps to release the spring clips. The tools should release the clip and also hook onto the side of the deck allowing easy access. If bolts, then carefully pry the plastic trim around the deck off. Theses are usually connected around angles with small security anchors, once you pop them up the trim should come off easy. The stereo should be held in by 4 screws, and removing them will allow you to pull the deck right out.

  4. Find the wiring harness/harnesses plugged into the back of your stereo and unplug them. This is how your stereo gets its power and also how it connects to the speakers. There is another wire to unplug as well, a lone wire for the antenna.

  5. If you have bought a harness for use with your pre-owned stereo, open it now. This harness is used to ensure that all the connections between your stereo and your car work just like the old stereo did. If you don’t have a harness or your cord’s have been sliced, you need to individually identify what each cord is and connect them together in the correct order.

  6. Attach your wires. Once you have the order for them to go, you have to attach them together and decide how you want to do that. Crimping is the easiest and quickest, the only thing to be careful about is that you are using the right size connectors. Most stereos use 18-gauge stereo wire, but some bigger vehicles use bigger gauges. You can also solder them together, and if you aren't using a harness this is your only option.  

  7. Mount the stereo- If using a mounting bracket this is when you would use it. For this portion I would advise to just follow the instructions in your kit.

  8. Test to make sure that your new stereo is pushing out some sick beats

 

And that’s it! Looking back I don’t see why I was throwing stuff around my back lot, but teenage boys are pretty stupid sometimes. Hope this is of some help to you guys, I have to go and beat my little brother at some kart racing!

 
 

Fancy Car Stereo